Louis S. Glanzman 1922-2013

Glanzman, Louis S. (Feb. 8, 1922- July 7, 2013), historical painter and book illustrator, was born in Baltimore, Maryland and raised in the farmlands of Virginia, before the economic strain of the Great Depression forced he and his family to move north to Rockaway, NYC.  

Louis S. Glanzman’s work was inspired by life’s struggles, his mother’s amateur love for painting, and the great musicians of the south, as he grew up listening Blues and Jazz.  He began his career at the age of sixteen as a comic book illustrator.  In the 40’s, he served as an illustrator on the Air Force magazine for the US Air Forces.  During the 50’s, he began his free-lance career as a children’s book illustrator, creating the look for the ever popular, Pippi Longstocking.

A distinguished American illustrator, Louis S. Glanzman’s prolific works have been enjoyed throughout national and international publications, galleries and historical landmarks.   His diversified career spanned across numerous genres comprising of caricature, fiction, non-fiction, portrait, historical, scenic and wildlife.

As you view his life’s works, you will agree with Glanzman’s credence, “At the heart of every painting is a story.”  He dedicated his life to his wife, children and grandchildren; however, he fulfilled his passion through “illustrating life in a picture.”

Artist, illustrator, historian, storyteller, visionary, reporter—always remarkably capturing the spirit of humanity—is Louis S. Glanzman.

Art Exhibits:

Glanzman’s paintings have been displayed in numerous art exhibits:  “Retrospective of illustrator and Artist”, The Enterprise Center at Burlington County College, NJ, “National Geographic:  The Art of Exploration”, a traveling show by the Norman Rockwell Museum, MA, and the Illustrator’s Club.


Over the years, Glanzman has been presented awards and accolades by esteemed organizations and publications such as the Society of Illustrators, Art Directors Club, Salmagundi Club, Wall Street Journal, the New York Times, and National Geographic Society.

Permanent Displays:

LSG’s works are displayed in permanent collections in many esteemed museums and galleries in the following locations:

National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian, Washington DC

Tennessee State Art Museum, Nashville, TN

National Monument, Columbus, OH

United States Air Force Historical Foundation, Peterson, CO

Civil War Life Museum, Fredericksburg, VA

Sitka, AK

Ford Theater, Washington, DC

Independence Park, Philadelphia, PA

Astrid Lindgren Museum, Sweden

LSG’s American History works are vast.  America’s National Parks are lined with imagery of historical life in the wayside information aids in addition to their instructional brochures, books and videos that were commissioned by the Department of Interior.

The Signing of the Constitution, noted to be one of the most accurately portrayed historical paintings, was commissioned by the Daughters of the American Revolution and was installed in Independence Hall, Philadelphia, PA.


LSG’s paintings have appeared in books, major magazines and digital media including the Visitor’s Intro at Independence Hall, the highly acclaimed children’s series Pippi Longstocking, Louis L’Amour’s Western novels, Saturday Evening Post, Colliers, True, Life, New Yorker, National Geographic, Reader’s Digest, Boy’s Life, and National Lampoon.

LSG’s talents, coupled with accuracy and timeliness, awarded him numerous commissions including, weekly, breaking news covers for Time magazine.  From 1966 to 1976 he painted over 80 covers, many completed within a 24-48 hour period to make the company’s print deadline.  During that time, it was not uncommon for his paintings to go to press with wet paint.  

LSG’s most challenging cover was capturing the historical event—Neil Armstrong’s Walking on the Moon.  With no reference point to paint by, the cover was created from Glanzman’s thoughtful vision and talent.

In the Studio:

LSG’s wide range of interests inspired several series of paintings including operas, men and women from the Bible, wildlife and ocean scenes, yet Glanzman’s first love was history.  This love took him from battlefields and excursions across the country to international archeological sites for in-depth research.  Many paintings that depict historic cultures are published in National Geographic Society books such as the Mysterious Maya, The Mighty Aztecs, The Incredible Incas and Their Timeless Land, The Vikings, and Clues to America’s Past.

Inspired by artists such as Howard Pyle, Norman Rockwell and Louis Armstrong, Glanzman worked in a variety of mediums with a seemless effort to capture the essence of the moment.  Robert Kennedy, tempera and ink on paper; Richard Nixon, acrylic on plywood; Pope Paul VI, tempera and mixed media on board.  Avant-garde mediums were also chosen to further depict the subject manner. For example, Lee Trevino’s portrait, painted on the head of an actual golf club, Vice President Agnew on bricks cemented to a board, and Saint Lawrence on charred planks of wood from a local namesake church, which was destroyed by fire.

The powerfully creative mind of LSG, never ceased to surprise and always to awe-inspire his employers, his family, and an endless lifetime of art aficionados.